Storm Water – South Jordan

Storm Water

Storm Water

Flood Mitigation

The Storm water division is responsible for the maintenance, cleaning, and inspection of the storm water infrastructure within the City to ensure that it is working properly and ready for storm events to prevent flooding and any subsequent damage. This includes street sweeping to prevent debris from entering and thus hindering the storm drain system from functioning properly.

Water Pollution Control & Prevention

As development continues within South Jordan, porous (water absorbing) open space surfaces give way to impervious (non-absorbent) concrete, asphalt, and rooftops that generate greater volumes of storm water runoff. This runoff, by design, is diverted to and carried through the storm drain system within the City mitigating the potential for flooding. However, the impervious materials and structures created in developing our community also accumulate and store many pollutants that are carried away with the runoff during a storm. Some of these pollutants include; oil and gas from vehicles, pesticides and fertilizers used in landscaping, pet waste, sediments and silts, household hazardous waste, grass clippings and leaves, swimming pool maintenance discharges, salt and de-icing chemicals, soaps and detergents from car washing activities, and many more.

Unlike the sanitary sewer system, in which the water and waste is carried through an underground system to treatment facilities, storm water, and the pollutants it carries, flow directly into the waterways of the Salt Lake Valley, mainly the Jordan River. It is a goal of the South Jordan City Stormwater Utility to reduce the amount of pollution entering the waterways within its boundaries.

In meeting this goal and the requirements set by the EPA and federal Clean Water Act, South Jordan City is a member of the Jordan Valley Municipality Coalition consisting of 13 Cities and Salt Lake County. This coalition has been issued a joint Utah Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (UPDES) permit by the State of Utah’s Department of Environmental Quality, which authorizes the members of the coalition to discharge municipal storm water into the waterways of the valley. The City has put together a Storm Water Management Plan (SWMP) in accordance with the guidelines of the UPDES permit and the EPA.

Some of the items the City is doing as part of the SWMP include public education and outreach programs, locating, investigating and eliminating illegal discharges into the storm drain system, monitoring and enforcing runoff and erosion control processes concerning construction activities, and minimizing the adverse impacts on storm water quality after construction. In addition, South Jordan has set up good housekeeping guidelines concerning the operations of the City and the impacts it has on storm water.

Links

Construction General Permit SWPPP Template

Residential Common Plan SWPPP Template

Stormwater Facilities Maintenance Agreement (private)

South Jordan BMP Guide

South Jordan Storm Water Management Program (SWMP)

DEQ database link for NOI/NOT

DEQ Common Plan General Permit UTRH00000

DEQ Construction General Permit UTRC00000

EPA Guide to developing a SWPPP

Please report any hazardous spills, or illegal polluting and dumping into the stormwater system immediately. If possible, take pictures and notes of the acts.

Emergency –  1-801-840-4000 (24 hours) or 911

South Jordan City –  1-801-446-HELP

Salt Lake County – 1-801-580-6681

Utah State DWQ – 1-801-536-4123 (24 hours)

EPA – 1- 888-890-1995

Permit Management Database

To access UPDES permit information in South Jordan City, log in through the site listed below for access to all sites.

Site link: https://www.stormpromax.com/login.aspx

User: publicuser@sjc.gov
Password: access

Remember…

  • Water runs downhill.
  • Water picks up everything.
  • Water flows to our lakes, rivers, streams, and creeks.

Please refer to and follow these guidelines to help reduce pollutants from entering the storm water system.

  • Do not use pesticide/herbicide/fertilizer if rain is expected. Apply only when wind speeds are low (less than 5 mph).
  • Do not mix or prepare pesticide/herbicide/fertilizer for application near storm drains.
  • Prepare the minimum amount of pesticide/herbicide/fertilizer needed for the job and use the lowest rate that will effectively control the issues.
  • Employ techniques to minimize off-target application (e.g. spray drift) of pesticide/herbicide/fertilizer, including consideration of alternative application techniques.
  • Calibrate pesticide/herbicide/fertilizer application equipment to avoid excessive application.
  • Sweep pavement and sidewalk if pesticide/herbicide/fertilizer is spilled or overspread on these surfaces.
  • Collect any lawn and garden clippings, pruning waste, and tree trimmings to chip for compost or remove to landfill that composts yard waste.
  • DO NOT blow or rake leaves, clippings, etc. into the street or storm drain.

Many of the cleaning practices restaurants use will cause storm water quality impairments once the water is allowed to leave the property. Cleaning practices that allow grease, food waste, trash and cleaning products to flow into the storm drain system contribute directly to the impairment of our water bodies. Some of the types of waste generated at restaurants and food service facilities include:

  • Fats, oils and grease
  • Floor solvents
  • Cleaning agents
  • Cigarette butts
  • Food waste
  • Styrofoam

Please refer to and follow these guidelines to help reduce pollutants from entering the stormwater system.

Inside Operations

  • Pour wash water into a janitorial or mop sink. Do not pour it onto parking lot, alley, street, or into a storm drain.
  • Recycle grease and oil. Do not pour it into sinks, floor drains, or onto parking lot or street.
  • Clean floor mats, filters, and garbage cans in a mop sink or floor drain. Do not wash them in a parking lot, alley, or street.

Outside Operations

  • Use dry methods for clean-up (sweeping, dry absorbents, etc.) and place solid waste in dumpster. Do not hose or spray down sidewalks and parking lot.
  • Keep dumpster area clean and lid closed. Do not fill with liquid waste or hose it out. Make sure the clean-out plug has not been removed and that the dumpster is not leaking.

Automotive maintenance facilities are considered storm water “hot spots” producing significant loads of hydrocarbons, trace metals, and other pollutants. Wastes generated in automobile maintenance facilities and by residents performing their own car maintenance include:

  • Solvents (paints and paint thinners)
  • Antifreeze
  • Brake fluid and brake lining
  • Batteries
  • Motor oils
  • Fuels (gasoline, diesel, kerosene)
  • Lubricating grease.

Please refer to and follow these guidelines to help reduce pollutants from entering the stormwater system.

Waste Reduction

  • Minimize the number of solvents used to make recycling easier and to reduce hazardous waste management costs.
  • Do all liquid cleaning at a centralized station to ensure that solvents and residues stay in one area.
  • Locate drip pans and draining boards to direct solvents back into solvent sink or holding tank for reuse.

Use Safer Alternatives

  • Use non-hazardous cleaners when possible.
  • Replace chlorinated organic solvents with non-chlorinated ones like kerosene or mineral spirits.
  • Purchase recycled products such as engine oil, transmission fluid, antifreeze, and hydraulic fluid to support the recycled products market.

Spill Clean Up

  • Use as little water as possible to clean spills leaks, and drips.
  • Use rags to clean small spills, dry absorbent material for larger spills, and a mop for general cleanup. Mop water can be disposed of via the sink or toilet to the sanitary sewer.
  • Have absorbent pads and booms on hand for spill response.

Good Housekeeping

  • Employee training and public outreach are necessary to reinforce proper disposal practices.
  • Conduct maintenance work such as fluid changes indoors.
  • Update facility schematics to accurately reflect all plumbing connections.
  • Monitor parked vehicles for leaks, and place pans under leaks to collect the fluids for proper disposal or recycling.
  • Promptly transfer used fluids to recycling drums or hazardous waste containers.
  • Do not pour liquid waste down floor drains, sinks, or outdoor storm drain inlets.
  • Obtain and use drain mats to cover drains in the event of a spill.
  • Store cracked batteries in leak proof secondary containers.
  • Keep dumpster areas clean and free of hazardous wastes.

Parts Cleaning

  • Use detergent-based or water-based cleaning systems instead of organic solvent degreasers.
  • Use steam cleaning and pressure washing instead of cleaning parts with solvent. The wastewater generated from steam cleaning can be discharged to the on-site oil/water separator.
  • Drain oil filters and other parts before recycling.
  • Never discharge pool or spa water to a street, alley, or storm drain.
  • When emptying a pool or spa, let chlorine dissipate for 5 to 7 days. Then recycle the water by gradually draining it onto a landscaped area.
  • Chlorinated water may be discharged into the sanitary sewer system by running a hose to a utility sink or to a sewer pipe cleanout junction.
  • DO NOT use copper-based algaecides. Control algae with chlorine or other alternatives to copper-based chemicals. Copper is harmful to aquatic life and cannot be completely removed by the sewage treatment plant.

Street Sweeping

The Storm Water Division operates two street sweepers that clean main roads monthly and neighborhood roads three times per year. Requests for street sweeping can be made if a particular street has significant debris (rocks, mud, leaves, etc.) or glass from an auto accident. Click here to submit a Service Request

Carwash Fundraisers

Car Washes are a great way to raise money for your organization, but please follow these guidelines to help protect our communities’ waterways.

  • Use only nontoxic, phosphate free or biodegradable soap
  • If possible find a large grassy area to drive the cars onto to drain water instead of the storm drain system
  • Wring sponges and rags into a bucket not onto the ground and empty the bucket into a sink or toilet

Alternatively, Why not let a commercial car wash host the event, do the work and you keep the proceeds for your good cause?

Connect to one of the car wash vendor links below for more information or call the contact person listed for each car wash. Please note that the car wash vendors listed on this site determine the terms and conditions necessary for hosting a fundraising/charity car wash and may vary from car wash business.

Car Wash Vendors

    • Supersonic Car Wash
      All locations
      Contact: David
      801-355-1205
      www.supersoniccarwash.com
    • Union Park Carwash
      Midvale
      Contact: John Fischer or Greg Larsen
      goldleafinc@earthlink.net
    • Willy Wash Car Wash
      Stan Sharp
      3215 East 3300 South
      Salt Lake City, Utah
      801-832-1900

 

Used Oil Drop-off Locations

Autozone Inc
1574 West 10400 South

Autozone Inc
3735 South Jordan Parkway

O’Reilly Auto Parts #2865
10363 S. Redwood Rd.

Texaco Xpress Lube
10207 S. Redwood Rd.

Trans Jordan Landfill
10873 S. 7200 W.

Wal-mart tire & Lube Express #2307
11327 S. Jordan Gateway Rd.

Household Hazardous Waste & E-waste

What are Household Hazardous Wastes?

Household hazardous waste include things like antifreeze, batteries, fluorescent light tubes, fuels, gasoline, oil, paint, pesticides, herbicides, fertilizers, transmission fluid, yard care chemicals, and other chemicals.

Household Hazardous Waste Drop-Off Locations…free to Salt Lake County residents:

Salt Lake Valley Solid Waste Management Facility
801 541-4078
6030 West California Avenue (1400 South)
Salt Lake City, Utah
Open Mon – Sat, 8 am – 4 pm

Trans Jordan Landfill
801 569-8994
10473 S. BACCHUS HWY
South Jordan, Utah
84009-6002
Open Mon – Sat, 8 am – 4 pm

Murray Public Services
801 270-2440
4646 South 500 West
Open Mon – Fri, 7 am – 3:30 pm
Accepts ONLY antifreeze, batteries, oil, and paint

What is E-Waste?

E-Waste or electronic waste include items like batteries, mobile phones, computers, televisions, audio equipment and printers. Generally, if an item contains a circuit board or battery, it is considered E-waste.

Electronic Waste Drop-Off Locations

The Salt Lake County Health Department offers e-waste recycling year-round and free of charge at two county collection facilities:

Salt Lake Valley Landfill Disposal and Recycling Facilities
(801) 974-6920
6030 West California Avenue (1300 South)
Salt Lake City, UT 84104

 

Pesticides, Herbicides, & Fertilizers

Nationally, one quarter of the pollutants found in rivers and streams originate from the residential use of pesticides, herbicides, and fertilizers. These materials can enter into our waterways through illegal dumping, run-off from excessive lawn irrigation, and from heavy rains. The following guidelines if followed can greatly reduce the potential of these pollutants from entering our waterways.

  • Use pesticide/herbicide/fertilizer only if there is an actual pest problem (not on a regular preventative schedule).
  • Do not use pesticide/herbicide/fertilizer if rain is expected. Apply only when wind speeds are low (less than 5 mph).
  • Do not mix or prepare pesticide/herbicide/fertilizer for application near storm drains.
  • Prepare the minimum amount of pesticide/herbicide/fertilizer needed for the job and use the lowest rate that will effectively control the issues.
  • Employ techniques to minimize off-target application (e.g. spray drift) of pesticide/herbicide/fertilizer, including consideration of alternative application techniques.
  • Calibrate pesticide/herbicide/fertilizer application equipment to avoid excessive application.
  • Sweep pavement and sidewalk if pesticide/herbicide/fertilizer is spilled or overspread on these surfaces.
  • Purchase only the amount of pesticide/herbicide/fertilizer that you can reasonably use in a given time period (month or year depending on the product).
  • Triple rinse containers, and use rinse water as product. Dispose of unused pesticide/herbicide/fertilizer as hazardous waste.
  • Dispose of empty pesticide/herbicide/fertilizer containers according to the instructions on the container label.