Planning & Zoning

Button that says apply for a permit

Planning Commission meetings will be held electronically until further notice. Instructions for joining the meeting are located on the first page of the agenda found here.

The Planning Department reviews and processes all development applications through City staff, Architectural Review Committee, Planning Commission, Appeals and Variance Hearing Officer, and City Council approvals. The Planning staff coordinates other City department reviews of projects as they are submitted. The staff also provides direct assistance to various boards, commissions, and committees. The Planning Division maintains and updates the City’s Zoning/Development Code, the official Zoning and Future Land Use maps, and the City’s General Plan.

The Planning Department can be reached at 801-446-HELP or by emailing jzarogoza@sjc.utah.gov

Information and Documents

Effective May 14th, 2019

SALT LAKE COUNTY PLAT REVIEW PROCEDURES PURPOSE
It is the intent to minimize the amount of time the plat review process demands, and to avoid duplicating efforts through multiple reviews of the same plat. This helps ensure faster parcel number generation for all recorded projects in the county.

Plats are reviewed in accordance with Utah State Statutes, including but not limited to:
10-9a-603(1),(4); 10-9a-604; 17-21-21; 17-23-17(3); 17-27a-603(1),(4) and 57-8-13(1);57-2a; 46-1-16UCA

A QUICK OVERVIEW OF WHAT WE LOOK FOR
1. Is the name unique?
2. Does the boundary description close?
3. Does the boundary description match the graphic representation?
4. Is the basis of bearing present and accurate?
5. Is the acreage shown for each lot/parcel/unit/common area/open space?
6. Surveyor Seal and City/Township approval boxes present?
7. Is the title block correct?
8. Are all parcels identified? I.e. private ownership, dedicated to public, HOA, common area, limited
common area, etc.
9. If a Condo: Declaration, building ties to perimeter, elevation, and dimensions provided?
10. If there are HOA parcels: Is the HOA name and mailing address included?
11. Are there split ownership issues?
12. Are addresses for each lot/parcel/unit/common area/open space present?

(A) STEPS FOR RECORDING
1. The plat will be submitted to the Plat Department for review. At this time, the plat should have had at
least 1 preliminary review completed by the municipality. The plat should be ready to be printed to
Mylar and ready for the signature collection process. The county plat review process may take up to five
business days.
2. A technician will create a PLAT REVIEW sheet highlighting any concerns found. Plat Review sheets
will be returned to the requesting party(s). Re-Reviews should be avoided and will be handled in the
same manner as above until all issues are resolved. When all issues are resolved, a PLAT REVIEW
sheet will be forwarded to the requesting party(s). It will state the plat is “Ready for Signatures”.
3. We request that the municipalities and/or developer contact our office at least 1 business day in advance
to schedule an appointment for recording. At this time, a signed copy of the corrected/final plat can be
forwarded to us for a quick final review.
4. Upon completion of a final review, a PLAT REVIEW sheet will be forwarded to the requesting party(s).
It will state the plat is “Ready to Record”. This form should be brought in when the plat is recorded to
help ensure any issues have been addressed.
5. No plats will be recorded after 4:30 pm. Plats submitted after 4:30 PM will be recorded on or after the
next business day.

(B) ITEMS LOOKED FOR ON FINAL REVIEW
1. Signature and acknowledgement issues: All owners involved must sign and be acknowledged properly.
This applies to plats, declarations, and all accompanying documents. All signatures, acknowledgements,
and documents must be originals or, in rare cases, a certified copy.
2. If the city has been deeded property prior to the recording of the plat they will need to sign as an owner.
Approvals on the plat do not substitute for this signature.
3. Blurry Notary Stamps/Missing Notary information: It is good practice to clearly label the notary’s name,
commission number and expiration date. A stamp alone is only passable if all of the information is
legible. This information can be handwritten next to the notary stamp.
**Price requests: Pricing will only be done on a final version of a plat that has all signatures and stamps. Prices
include all pages/sheets of the plat. Also, be aware that on May 14, 2019, the Recorder’s Office fee schedule
changed to reflect legislation of HB247. All plats now have a $50/sheet charge along with a fee of $2 per
lot/unit/common area/etc. Documents submitted for recording (excluding plats) will now be charged a $40 fee
with an additional $2 fee for each description exceeding ten. https://recorder.slco.org/SLCR/Home.aspx

(C) COMMON ISSUES FOUND DURING REVIEW AND AT TIME OF RECORDING
1. Municipalities need to approve/provide addresses. If there is confusion in this area, the County Addressing
Department needs to be advised. Plats reviewed by the Recorder’s Office must have complete addressing.
2. Split ownership: If any lot/parcel/unit/open space includes existing parcels owned by separate owners, the
plat does not join ownership. The plat will create unintended parcels based on the underlying ownership
lines. Split ownership leads to confusion and is advised to be avoided whenever possible.
3. The only properties conveyed by a plat (with proper conveyance language) are areas dedicated to a city, a
non-taxable entity for PUBLIC use, or an HOA. These are typically for roads, open spaces, parks, canals, or
common areas. In the case of an HOA, the full name of the association and an assessment address should be
identified in the Owner’s Dedication area or in a note on the plat. The verbiage “TO BE” does not convey
ownership. A separate document will need to be recorded to transfer ownership if “TO BE” is used.
4. Ownership issues need to be resolved prior to bringing in a plat to record. This may require the involvement
of a title company.
5. Basis of Bearing: Monuments must either be known section corner monuments or known monuments from
within an existing/recorded subdivision. The name of the subdivision should be noted if street monuments
are used. Also, double ties should be provided wherever possible.
6. Surveys: Variations between survey descriptions and record descriptions need to be identified and called
out. I.e. Beg W 1323 ft. (1320 ft. by deed).
7. Declarations: References between declarations and plats should be consistent and accurate.
8. HOA parcels: The name of the HOA stated on the plat should match the entity created by the declaration
and filed with the state. Contact information should be provided for the HOA. (Address, in care of, etc.)
9. Handwritten additions to the plat: The review process is designed to eliminate the need for additions at the
time of recordation.

(D) POST RECORDATION
Interior dimensions are often incorrect. This leads to confusion and additional time spent searching for another
solution.
a. Curve tables and line tables need quality control checks.
b. All polygons must close and all boundary line segments must be annotated correctly.
**If problems arise caused by missing or incorrect interior dimensions, the requesting party(s) will be notified.
The plat will not be processed, and no new parcel numbers will be issued until documents are recorded
correcting the item(s) in question.
*** The creation of parcel numbers is not automatic and takes approximately 2 to 3 weeks. This timing should
be considered when issuing permits, etc

16.04.190: PARKS, PARK STRIPS, WALKWAYS, TRAILS, AND OPEN SPACE:

All applicants shall incorporate into development design and implement the following
requirements pertaining to parks, park strips, trails and open space. Parks, park strips, trails and
open space are also subject to the requirements of Title 16, Chapter 16.30, “Water Efficiency
Standards”, of this Code.

A. Park Strips:
1. Collector Street Park Strips: Park strips at the rear or side of single-family residential
lots and collector street park strips along commercial, office, multi-family residential,
industrial, and institutional developments shall be planted with a combination of trees,
plants, shrubs or other live vegetation which are low maintenance and commonly found
along the Wasatch Front or within similar climates. Lawn shall not be installed in park
strips. Applicants shall demonstrate that proposed live vegetation will cover a
minimum of 50% of the park strip area upon landscape maturity. Tree canopies do not
count toward the required 50% vegetation coverage. In combination with the 50% live
vegetation requirement, the following may be used:
a. Mulch made of bark or rock material that is one and one-half inches (1.5”) or
larger may be used in combination with live vegetation, provided that it is fully
contained within the park strip at all times.
b. Up to fifty percent (50%) of the park strip area, per street frontage, may be
hardscape, with stamped natural earth tone colored concrete. However,
stamped concrete shall not be used in sections greater than fifteen (15) linear
feet per section.

2. Residential Street Park Strips: Residential street park strips shall be planted with a
combination of trees, plants, shrubs or other live vegetation which are low maintenance
and commonly found along the Wasatch Front or within similar climates. Lawn shall
not be installed in park strips. Applicants shall demonstrate that proposed live
vegetation will cover a minimum of 50% of the park strip area upon landscape
maturity. Tree canopies do not count toward the required 50% vegetation coverage. In
combination with the 50% live vegetation requirement, the following may be used:
a. Mulch made of bark or rock material that is one and one-half inches (1.5”)
or larger may be used in combination with live vegetation, provided that it
is fully contained within the park strip at all times.
b. Stamped natural earth tone colored concrete or masonry materials such as
pavers may cover a maximum of twenty-five percent (25%) of the park
strip area per street frontage and shall not be used in sections greater than
fifteen (15) linear feet per section.

3. Park Strip Materials, Colors, And Sizes: All other park strip materials, colors, and sizes
shall be viewed by City Engineer for consideration of approval. The City Engineer may
approve greater than fifty percent (50%) hardscape within the park strip based on the
applicant’s street tree planting plan that clearly incorporates tree species, canopy,
spacing, and ground covers into a superior green design that reasonably offsets the
increased percentage of hardscape materials.

Landscaping And Maintenance:
a. The applicant shall install all required collector street landscaping improvements
and properly maintain said improvements until the City releases one hundred
percent (100%) of the improvement guarantee. After satisfactory installation of
landscaping in collector street park strips and the one hundred percent (100%)
release of the improvement guarantee for said landscaping, the City will accept
responsibility for maintenance of the park strips along collector streets where
collector street fencing has been installed along the rear and side property lines of
lots only in single-family residential subdivisions.
b. The owners of property in all other developments are responsible for the proper
landscaping and maintenance of other public or private park strips. All landscaping
in these park strips shall be maintained by the abutting property owner in a safe and
well-kept condition and in a way that presents a healthy, neat, vigorously living,
and orderly appearance. This maintenance shall include weeding, watering,
fertilizing, pruning, mowing, edging, mulching, or other maintenance, in
accordance with acceptable horticultural practices. Trash, other debris, and weeds
shall not be allowed to collect in these areas.

Small Trees: Minimum park strip of 3′ for adequate rooting. May be planted under power lines.

Botanical Name Common Name Salt Tolerant Drought Tolerant
Acer campestre hedge maple Y Y
Acer ginnala amur maple Y Y
Acer griseum paperbark maple Y N
Acer tataricum tatarian maple Y Y
Amalanchier alnifolia western serviceberry Y Y
Cercis canadensis eastern redbud N Y
Crataegus crus-galli cockspur hawthorn Y Y
Cratagegus phaenopyrum Washington hawthorn Y Y
Malus spp crabapple Y Y
Prunus virginiana chokecherry Y Y
Syringa reticulata Japanese tree lilac Y Y

 

Medium Trees: Minimum park strip of 4′ for adequate rooting. Must NOT be planted under power lines.

Botanical Name Common Name Salt Tolerant Drought Tolerant
Acer grandidentatum bigtooth maple Y Y
Carpinus betulus European hornbeam N Y
Corylus colurna Turkish filbert N Y
Ginkgo biloba Ginko Y N
Koelreuteria paniculata golden raintree Y Y
Morus alba fruitless mulberry Y Y
Parrotia persica persian parrotia Y Y
Prunus serrulata ‘Kwanzan’ Kwanzan cherry Y Y
Ulmus parvifolia lacebark elm Y Y

 

Large Trees: Minimum park strip of 5′ for adequate rooting. Must NOT be planted under power lines.

Botanical Name Common Name Salt Tolerant Drought Tolerant
Acer pseudoplatanus sycamore maple Y Y
Catalpa speciosa northern catalpa Y Y
Celtis occidentalis common hackberry Y Y
Fagus sylvatica European beech N Y
Gleditsia triacanthos honeylocust Y Y
Gymnocladus dioica Kentucky coffee tree Y Y
Liriodendron tulipifera tulip poplar N Y
Platanus x acerifolia London planetree Y Y
Quercus macrocarpa bur oak Y Y
Quercus rubra northern red oak Y Y
Sophora japonica Japanese pagodatree Y Y
Taxodium distichym baldcypress Y Y
Tilia americana American linden Y Y
Tilia cordata little-leaf linden Y Y
Zelkova serrata Japanese zelkova Y Y

 

Xeriscape Trees: Minimum park strip of 3′ for adequate rooting. Drought tolerant once established.

Botanical Name Common Name Salt Tolerant Mature Size
Acer saccharinum silver maple (and cultivars such as ‘autumn blaze’) Y small
Amalanchier utahensis Utah serviceberry Y small
Celtis laevigata var. reticulata netleaf hackberry Y small
Gymnocladus dioicus Kentucky coffee tree N large
Juniperus scopulorum rocky mountain juniper Y medium
Pinus edulis pinyon pine Y medium

 

Non-approved Street Tree Species:

Botanical Name Common Name
Acer tataricum silver maple (and cultivars such as ‘autumn blaze’)
Ailanthus altissima tree-of-heaven
Fraxinus spp. ash (all ash species are susceptible to emerald ash borer)
Pinus nigra Austrian Pine
Populus spp. poplar (all poplar species, including cottonwoods and quaking aspen)
Pyrus calleryana flowering pear
Salix spp. willows (all)
Ulmus pumila Siberian elm
Thorned trees
Fruit and nut bearing trees
Evergreen trees pine, spruce, cedar, fir, etc

This species list for streetscape trees was created by researching which trees can handle the pressures of
an urban setting. Although not a perfect list, it provides a guideline. When planting trees in a streetscape
setting, one should consider the amount of salt that the trees will receive in the winter, due to snowplows
and the source of irrigation (e.g., secondary water tends to yield soils with high alkalinity). It is also very
important that the size of each species be considered, and each tree planted in the right place. Many of
the large trees will lift sidewalks in smaller park strips.

For inquiries about species that are not listed, or corrections for the species listed above, contact:
Mike Bunnell – Urban Forester
South Jordan City
(801) 446-4357
mbunnell@sjc.utah.gov

* Some cultivars of individual species may still grow too tall to be placed under power lines. Check with
local nursery for exact cultivar height.